6 Tools to Help Calm Your Anxious Child

 

Last week I ended my series “What Autism Looks Like in Our Home”. It included emotional reactivity (aka meltdowns), sensory issues, sleep problems, anxiety, and food aversions. This is not an exclusive list by any means but these are the Top 5 that stand out to me as we raise our son.

Today I’d like to share some of the tools I did not mention in this series, that we’ve used to help with these daily issues.

(This post contains affiliate links. All products we promote we have used or purchased for our own family’s needs. For more details, read our advertising disclosure.)

Yoga Ball

This has been a huge hit in our home. We originally bought this for our daughter with ADHD. It works wonders for her when she just can’t settle down and is super fidgety. It also works for our son when he’s bored or just needs to get some energy out.

Activity Books

Our son loves books. Before he could even read he would sit and look through books often. Over the last year we’ve found that he particularly enjoys activity books – mazes, puzzles, and seek and finds. Read More

Autism in Our Home: Emotional Reactivity

Emotional Reactivity.

Emotional Reactivity

I saw this phrase when our son and I were at one of his occupational therapy appointments. It’s a pretty big word, but basically means, “Freak-outs that result in huge meltdowns!”

Well, at least that is my unprofessional, “mother of a special-needs child” opinion.

When our Little Man was first having these meltdowns, I thought were just really bad temper tantrums. Something that boys do. We have 2 daughters who are older than our son, and I have one sister. So I have no idea what it’s like to have a little boy in the house.

Obviously, this is not a normal way for little boys, or girls, to behave.

Yes there is always the occasional tantrum. Some kids have temper tantrums more than others. But here, I’m talking major meltdowns. It may be hard to know the difference between the two. I found this amazing infographic on Pinterest that helps explain how tantrums and meltdowns are 2 very different issues. Read More